How To Build Raised Bed Gardens

Sunday, March 5, 2017 Raised Gardens  No comments

Copyright (c) 2012 Jack Russell

Raised bed gardens make gardening easy. There are a number of benefits to gardening with a raised bed, and these handy garden beds are fairly simple to build.

What is a Raised Bed Garden?

This type of gardening saves the gardener from dealing with bad soil conditions. The garden is built above ground, and filled with the soil of your preference. From then on, you have complete control over the texture of the soil, and its ingredients. It can be tailored to fit any plant.

The garden should be built above the native soil, and may even include it. The garden can be built free-form, or contained without hindering plant growth. Just about anything can be planted inside the garden.

Benefits

1. Less weeds.

Because these gardens are built above ground, with a barrier around the length of them, pathway weeds won’t make it in.

2. Prevents soil compaction.

The soil won’t get compacted because the garden is built with accessibility, soil, and the plants in mind.

3. Drains better.

The raised garden provides better drainage, and prevents garden soil from being washed away during storms.

4. Pest control.

The barriers help keep pests such as slugs and snails out of the mix, leaving your garden safe.

5. Easier access.

Having a raised garden will help you to avoid back pain, because you won’t have to bend down as far, or kneel to take care of you plants.

6. Open bottom.

The open bottom allows for the plants’ roots to reach as far into the ground as they need to gain access to any available nutrients.

7. Easily constructed.

They’re easy to build, and can be made with a variety of materials.

Construction

1. The right wood.

Ultimately, it’s up to you to choose the right kind of wood for your garden. However, Cedar Wood tends to be particularly good, because it’s naturally resistant to rot. Redwood is another rot resistant wood that can work nicely. These woods should last for a long time before they begin to deteriorate, depending on the weather.

2. Height

There is no real height limit for these gardens. The most common height lies around 11 inches. Any garden taller than 18 inches will require extra support, to prevent the wood from bowing out from the pressure of the soil. The plants you’re planning to include should also play a part in height. The soil-depth requirements for plants differ, and certain plants will need a higher garden bed.

3. Materials

You’ll need: lumber (Cedar Wood), fastenings, cross supports (aluminum flat stock), hand saw, screwdriver, square, mallet, hacksaw, drill, and a carpenter’s level,

4. Assemble Frame

Clear out the area where you plan to build your garden, and begin to build the frame. Saw the boards to the desired length, and use screws at the corners to hold the boards together.

5. Corner Posts

Cut the posts longer than needed, and set the first post into the bottom corner of the frame. Drive it a few inches into the ground, and then screw the posts into the frame.

6. Finish Frame, Add Soil

Add the bottom boards to the frame, and screw them into the posts. Now, you can fill the garden with soil, and begin gardening!

Jack Russell is retired and likes pottering in his herb and vegetable garden. He is building a raised bed garden  and likes container gardens, too. Jack has found helpful information at http://www.raisedbedgardens.net  You can also sign up for a free newsletter and free copy of an interesting 100 year old book on growing herbs.
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