SAFETY IN THE KITCHEN AND DINNING ROOM

Monday, October 10, 2016 Raymond's Place  No comments

Any time you are working, playing, or just hanging out: Safety should be looked at. Most people don’t worry about being safe because they use common sense. This is a very handy way of handling your safety in life. When some rules are put in for safety you may not understand the why. I will name some rules of safety, and explain my understanding by way of personal experience. Remember you are very smart and once you see the trouble you can put yourself in you will most likely want to practice some of these rules, also some of these rules make you a safe employee to protect the customers.

Let’s start at the top; your hair. Keeping your hair short for both men and women lessen the chance of falling hair in food, also it makes it easy to keep it well groomed. Some people don’t wash their hair every day. This maybe fine, but after three days the dead skin on your head may start to itch, and this mean you will want to scratch it. Now you need to go wash your hands.

The face is washed every day whether you want to or not. Why, It help you to wake up and feel refreshed, also taking a shower at the same time will also clean all the dead skin, and sweat on your body which causes body order. Now that your body is clean and ready to get dressed you may want to put clean clothes on, and don’t smoke before you go to work. The smell will get in your hair and on your clean clothes which defeats the reason for taking a shower. Men and women should have a clean face. Men should shave every day, and woman should go light on the make-up. Both should not put on any strong perfume, or cologne, in fact I don’t recommend putting on any perfume, or cologne.

Of course, you brush your teeth every day to keep them clean of food, and film, also helps kill bad breath. One more thing is a tong cleaner, which may be found in a Chines, or Japanese market if you can’t find it in any other market. This cleans the tong from any other bacteria, or brush your tong.

The clothes you ware for work are part of a uniform. Most restaurant supply the kitchen with kitchen whites, and in the dining, room the wait staff usually wares clothe they purchased, like example: White shirt or blouse, black pants, and black shoes. Other parts of their appeal, like a vest, or apron are supplied by the restaurant. Everything should be clean every day without exception. One of the things I did as a waiter was to have five white shirts, five pairs of black paints, and two pairs of shoes. The two pairs of black shoes are what I learned in the Army training when I was young, but didn’t quite understand why, until my Drill Sargent explained that the sweat in your shoes can dry out and spraying a disinfectant would help keep from getting althea’s foot. Let look at the shoes you plan on wearing; are they clean, do they have a shine, and the most important do they have a good arch, and are they grease retardant. The good arch helps keep your feet, and legs from getting tired You are on your feet most of the day and damage to the bottom of your shoes need to be examined once a week to make sure you have a sole on your shoe. I had an incident when I was working as a waiter on a cruise ship, and the bottom of my shoe cracked without my knowledge, and because of that my foot went out of order (I was in pain) and couldn’t figure out what was wrong until I saw the bottom of my shoe. The next day I put on my extra pair of shoes. In the next port, I bought myself two more pairs of shoes and throughout the broken ones. In the work area where you set up to do work behind the scenes of the customers you want to have a small bucket of bleach water, bar towel, and a clean towel for yourself. The clean towel can be tossed and replaced continually, and wash your hands through the duration of your work day.

The bleach water and towel can be used to wipe any counter space of food, or liquid spills.

 

In the kitchen, all these rules apply as the same as in the dining room, and a few more. Keeping a clean apron; keeps food bacteria from passing from your hands to the apron, to different food. This is called cross contamination. Keeping a clean towel handy to wipe your hands on can help tremendously. The clean towel can be tossed and replaced continually, and wash your hands throughout the duration of your work day.

When handling food in these days it has been recommended, and some restaurants are using gloves. These help people handle food a little better, and keep cross contamination from happening. The health books say to change the gloves continually, and wash your hands throughout the duration of your work day.

For everyone using tools to perform their work should keep them clean, and when handling dirty dishes always wash your hands after putting them away.

In the dining room, I saw many wait staff pick up glasses with their fingers on the rim and taking them away from the table. Growing up I didn’t see this a problem until my Maitre’D explained it in a very simple way. You put your fingers in the glasses, and move them away from the table, then without thinking or washing your hands you rub your eyes, even a little bit to the side of your eye, and before you know it the next morning or a couple days later your eyes are infected, and red, and you are now out of work because nobody wants to see your sick face.

Why did this happen? The glass of one customer you picked had a disease, cold, flue, or some other type of bacteria that caused an infection to your eye. Remember you are not the only one who is caring bacteria around.

Food = bacteria

Note** When I wore extended ware contact lenses I was able to wear them for one week working as a cook or as a waiter. When I worked as a warehouse man where there is a lot of dirt I was able to ware my extended ware contact lenses for two weeks or even three week depending on how tired my eyes got.

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